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you for your time this evening. the absurd drama of the sow called fiscal cliff negotiations and the best investment out there. that's ahead on "viewpoint." as i looked out across the battlefield at antietam. i saw the future of one great nation. but only barely, because the sun was like, way in my grill. george mcclellan, the general, hands me his pair of foster grant sunglasses, and i could see! my wife, mary todd, found them so fetching. >> he looked so fine i started to call him babe-raham lincoln. >> i was like, mary, please. >> you look like a baby, a literal child. i bought a pair online, shipped to 115 main st., that's my gettysburg address. i'm funny. i find them to be affordable frames, of the people, for the people, and, not, by the people, that's part of this freedom thing. end slavery, let people buy awesome sunglasses. who's behind those foster grants? abraham stinkin' lincoln. >> i came up with that slogan myself. view want the great bargain for the holiday season? i got one for you and it's the number of the day. two for one. that's the deal the co
event in pennsylvania to tout his proposal in the fiscal cliff negotiations saying that the american people made their economic wishes clear on the election day. >> obama: this was a central questions in the election. maybe the central question in the election. you remember. we talked about this a lot. at the end of the day a clear majority of americans--democrats republicans, independents--they agreed with a balanced. >> eliot: republicans meanwhile openly deride the president's proposal saying they're the ones taking negotiations seriously. >> the proposal that was delivered here by secretary geithner the speaker and me yesterday was not a serious proposal. >> i mean, it's--it's--it's--it was not a serious proposal. i think the debt crisis that we face requires us to make serious decisions. >> we're not playing a game. we're being serious. >> eliot: bottom line. let's hope there is a different script being played out behind the scenes. joining me now for some serious wisdom is staff reporter for mother jones andy kroll. thank you for joining me tonight. >> my pleasure. >> eliot: is
." who is afraid of the big bad so-called fiscal cliff? maybe it should be termed the nice gradual fiscal slope. we've certainly heard a lot of ceos and other financial cassandras in recent weeks prove size doom if it a deal isn't cut by year's owned. but washington, both side have dug in their heels, and the answer may be that suddenly the sliding down the fiscal slope does not seem that bad. maybe that's why the republicans leaders like speaker of the house john boehner were able to put off making a counter proposal to the president's offer until today. crossing the red line on the talks by rejecting the demind that the republicans accept a hike in the marginal tax rate for those with income over a quarter million dollars a year. my view? obviously i agree with the white house on the substance and as i have said before, their hand gets stronger over time. but sometimes a new idea can change the dynamic. here is an idea that has been around for a long time, supported by james tobin way back and pushed by ralph nadar in a "washington post" op-ed this weekend. impose a tax on financial tra
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3